Global Health Service Corps

Press Releases

Global Health Service Corps and the Peace Corps Open Applications for Medical and Nursing Educators

 

 

Global Health Service Partnership will address the critical lack of health care educators in sub-Saharan Africa helping to build a pipeline of providers to support health care systems
Washington, D.C., July 21, 2012 Global Health Service Corps (GHSC) today announces the inaugural season for applications from qualified doctors and nurses for the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP), a new program in partnership with the Peace Corps. The new GHSP Volunteers will serve one year assignments as faculty members of medical and nursing schools. The program will launch in Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda in 2013. Global Health Service Corps and Peace Corps made this announcement on the eve of the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C.

Vanessa Kerry, M.D., MSc. Chief Executive Officer of the Global Health Service Corps said, “this public-private partnership will work with our partner countries to identify the country needs, then help augment the teaching and training opportunities in each country. The dual impact of this program will be to meet immediate teaching needs and to build a pipeline of future medical and nursing educators. While this idea has been discussed in recent years, we will finally have a solution that puts volunteers on the ground. GHSC will provide loan repayments to help encourage service and reduce the significant barrier of debt for many potential volunteers.”

“We are enormously excited about the partnership with the Peace Corps,” said  Fitzhugh Mullan, MD, Chair of the Global Health Service Corps Board.  “Education and training are the key to stronger health systems world-wide.  The faculty who work abroad in the GHSP will be putting their shoulders to the task of graduating more doctors and nurses to build those systems and expand treatment and care.” “We are pleased to accept applications from medical and nursing professionals who will be able to immediately impact public health systems in sub-Saharan Africa,” said Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williiams. “Through this program these medically trained volunteers will address the shortage of health professionals and train others to be better prepared for the future.”

GHSC will work with the Peace Corps, Ministries of Health and in-country institutional partners. GHSC will begin with nurse and physician volunteers but plans to expand it to other medical professionals. Pat Daoust, MSN, RN, GHSC’s Chief Nursing Officer, said “GHSP provides a unique opportunity for U.S. nurse educators to work collaboratively with their overseas colleagues in addressing a long recognized barrier to building strong and sustainable health care systems. As faculty and clinical mentors, our volunteers will live, learn and work together with the nursing community. I believe we are helping to fulfill one of the original goals of the Peace Corps.”

In March, the Peace Corps, the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Health Service Corps announced the launch of this innovative public-private partnership to address health professional shortages by investing in capacity building for medical and nursing education programs in less developed countries.

Volunteers serving through the program will be Peace Corps Response volunteers receiving monthly living stipends, transportation to and from their country of service, comprehensive medical care, vacation days, and readjustment allowance. The Global Health Service Corps will raise funds from the private sector to finance loan repayment stipends for eligible volunteers. Applications will be open through October 2012. The first cohort will be named in February 2013 for a July 2013 deployment.

Peace Corps Now Accepting Applications for Global Health Service Partnership Positions

 WASHINGTON, D.C., July 20, 2012 – Peace Corps today announced the agency is now accepting applications from qualified individuals interested in serving as medical or nursing educators in Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda through the Peace Corps Response program.  Volunteers will serve one-year assignments teaching clinical health skills to local practitioners. Peace Corps made the announcement on the eve of the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., July 21-27, 2012. To learn more about Peace Corps' work during the conference, visit: www.peacecorps.gov/AIDS2012.

“We’re thrilled to accept applications from medical and nursing professionals who will be able to immediately impact public health systems in sub-Saharan Africa,” said Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams (returned Peace Corps volunteer, Dominican Republic, 1967-1970). “Peace Corps volunteers work directly with people in the local communities for sustainable change. Through this program, these medically trained volunteers will address the shortage of health professionals and train others to be better prepared in the future.”

In March, the Peace Corps, the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the Global Health Service Corps announced the launch of this innovative public-private partnership to place nurses and physicians as adjunct faculty in medical or nursing schools overseas. The partnership will address health professional shortages by investing in capacity and building support for existing medical and nursing education programs in less developed countries.

Volunteers serving through the program will receive the same benefits as Peace Corps Response volunteers, including: monthly living stipends, transportation to and from their country of service, comprehensive medical care, readjustment allowances and vacation days. They will also receive additional technical training and support and may extend service for a second year if successful during the initial year. The Global Health Service Corps, independently of the Peace Corps, will also raise funds from the private sector to finance loan repayment stipends for eligible volunteers.

In January 2012, Peace Corps announced the expansion of the Peace Corps Response program, allowing experienced professionals to serve in short-term, high-impact Peace Corps assignments in dozens of countries around the world. Click here to apply for open positions.

About the Peace Corps: Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order on March 1, 1961, more than 200,000 Americans have served in 139 host countries. Today, 9,095 volunteers are working with local communities in 75 host countries. Peace Corps volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a 27-month commitment and the agency’s mission is to promote world peace and friendship and a better understanding between Americans and people of other countries. Visit www.peacecorps.gov for more information.

Peace Corps, PEPFAR, and Global Health Service Corps Launch Public-Private Partnership to Boost Training for Health Professionals in Developing Countries
Program expected to launch in three sub-Saharan African countries

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 13, 2012 —The Peace Corps, the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the Global Health Service Corps are launching an innovative public-private partnership to place nurses, physicians and other health professionals as adjunct faculty in medical or nursing schools overseas. The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) will address health professional shortages by investing in capacity and building support for existing medical and nursing education programs in less developed countries. The new program is expected to begin in Tanzania, Malawi and Uganda in July 2013. Participants will serve in the Peace Corps Response program for one-year assignments.

“Through this exciting new partnership, the Peace Corps will supply medical and nursing professionals to help developing countries strengthen their public health systems,” said Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams. “By building on the Peace Corps’ model of grassroots assistance, as well as our existing infrastructure in developing countries, we will work with medical and nursing schools to build capacity, bring critical prevention and health care to remote communities and provide additional service opportunities for Americans.”

“The Global Health Service Partnership is an innovative initiative to address the need for health care professionals in countries hard-hit by HIV/AIDS,” said U.S. Global AIDS Coordination Ambassador Eric Goosby. “Country ownership – with partner countries leading the way in the fight against AIDS – depends on countries having strong health systems, and that in turn depends on a strong health workforce. PEPFAR is proud to partner with Peace Corps in supporting countries’ efforts to save the lives of their own people.”

“The shortage of health professionals is profound in many areas of the world, and sadly worst where the global burden of disease is highest,” said Global Health Service Corps Executive Director and Mass General physician, Vanessa Bradford Kerry. “These shortages limit the ability of developing countries to deliver even basic health care let alone respond to new, unforeseen epidemics. There is great interest among US health professionals who have both the commitment and expertise to serve abroad and help make a difference. The GHSP helps harness this dedication by strengthening existing nursing and medical education programs to create a force multiplier effect.”

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 12:00 A.M. EDT MARCH 13, 2012
Contact: Press Office: 202.692.2230
pressoffice@peacecorps.gov

Under the new partnership, GHSP volunteers will primarily function as medical or nursing educators, working alongside local faculty counterparts to teach and transfer clinical skills. Volunteers will also participate in direct medical care appropriate to effective education and mentorship. The Global Health Service Corps will make significant contributions to the program by raising awareness of GHSP among qualified professionals, and by providing technical support to the program, its volunteers and the teaching institutions overseas. It will help evaluate the effectiveness of the partnership deployments, responding to meet the particular needs of each clinical site. Consulting staff include senior global health leaders who are skilled and experienced in health care delivery, medical education and patient care quality in resource poor settings. It will also, independently of the Peace Corps, raise funds from the private sector to finance loan repayment stipends for eligible volunteers. GHSP volunteers will receive the same benefits as Peace Corps Response volunteers, including: monthly living stipends,
transportation to and from their country of service, comprehensive medical care, readjustment allowances and vacation days. They will also receive additional technical training and support and may extend service for a second year if successful during the initial year.
In January 2012, Peace Corps announced the expansion of the Peace Corps Response program, allowing experienced professionals to serve in short-term, high-impact Peace Corps assignments in dozens of countries around the world. The GHSP partnership is part of this Peace Corps expansion. The application process for the GHSP volunteers is expected to begin in September 2012 through the Peace Corps Response online application.
###

About the Peace Corps: Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order on March 1, 1961, more than 200,000 Americans have served in 139 host countries. Today, 9,095 volunteers are working with local communities in 75 host countries. Peace Corps volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a 27-month commitment and the agency’s mission is to promote world peace and friendship and a better understanding between Americans and people of other countries. Visit www.peacecorps.gov for more information.

About PEPFAR: The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is the U.S. Government initiative to help save the lives of people affected by HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR is the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease internationally and PEPFAR investments also provide a platform for efforts to address other public health needs. PEPFAR is driven by a shared responsibility among donor and partner nations and others to make smart investments to save lives. For more information, visit www.pepfar.gov.

About the Global Health Service Corps (GHSC): The GHSC is a national non-profit whose mission is to support health professionals to serve in medical, nursing, and public health education in resource-poor settings. Our greater goal is, in collaboration with our partners, to create sustainable solutions to strengthen health systems and address the vast shortages of health professionals in many parts of the world. GHSC believes educators provide a force multiplier effect. GHSC is committed to helping recruit the best-qualified candidates, including those who may have financial constraints to service, by raising and disbursing loan repayment and other appropriate stipends of support to individuals chosen for assignments abroad. 

Download this article